Ship's Blog - Fishermen's Finest

The 226th Plenary Session of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council takes place the week of December 7th at the Hilton Hotel, 500 W. 3rd Avenue, Anchorage, AK.  

Click on the link below for the most up to date information
(subject to change up and through the meeting):

Agenda - 226th Plenary Session

Fishermen's Finest ~ A team of Excellence ~ Our name says it all. 

 

We believe safety isn't an accident - you have to work proactively to maintain a safe workplace and to train a safe workforce.  That is why we encourage our crew to better themselves by attending safety courses offered through organazations such as

Not only do we encourage our crew, we step up to the plate and pay for our crew to attend.  Further, a more trained crewmember will move up in the pay scale aboard the vessels.  It's a win-win-win. 

Frightful (not really) Friday before Halloween Fun for the Fishermen's Finest Kirkland Team

Kristian Uri (Swedish Chef), Debbie Kowalski (Gangster) & Courtney Banks (Cat) 

We send our best wishes to all for a safe and festive Halloween!

Where is the science in seafood sustainability and certification?

 

It is about money and values – science has been largely lost

Seafood sustainability is again in the news as the Global Seafood Sustainability Initiative (GSSI) released its tool for evaluating the sustainability of fisheries. The GSSI tool has drawn immediate criticism from World Wildlife Fund (WWF) as they recently published an article titled, “GSSI compliance does not indicate sustainability certification, WWF warns.” This is an interesting development since WWF is on the board of GSSI. GSSI is intended to provide an agreed standard for the wide range of certification and seafood labeling schemes. As their web site says “GSSI is a global platform and partnership of seafood companies, NGOs, experts, governmental and intergovernmental organizations working towards more sustainable seafood for everyone.” So who is right in this case, does the GSSI benchmarking tool tell you if a fishery is sustainable?

At its core, seafood sustainability is about the ability to produce food from the sea in the long term. Put another way, we can ask ‘Are the fishery and its management system operated in such a way that our grandchildren can still enjoy the same production from the fishery (subject to the constraints of external factors such as climate change) as we do today?’

Our flagship vessel AMERICAN No.1 called on St. Paul Island last week.  

Located in the Central Bering Sea, St. Paul is an important port for the Bering Sea Fishing Fleet

Thank you to our vendors, AC Value Center, North Pacific Fuel (Petro Star), Penair and Trident Seafoods for taking good care of us - we couldn't do what we do without you.

Read about The Weatherman at the end of the Western World from John Ryan at KUCB Unalaska Community Broadcasting.

Fishermen's Finest ~ a team of excellence ~ our name says it all.

We believe safety isn't an accident - you have to work proactively to maintain a safe workplace and to train a safe workforce.  That is why we encourage our crew to better themselves by attending safety courses offered through organazations such as

Not only do we encourage our crew, we step up to the plate and pay for our crew to attend.  Further, a more trained crewmember will move up in the pay scale aboard the vessels.  It's a win-win-win.

 

Our Dennis Moran is interviewed by ABC News Alaska's Dorene Lorenz on September 22, 2015

https://vimeo.com/147050904

Click www.YourAlaskaLink.com for the interview and learn more about AMERICA'S FINEST tm 
262' Skipsteknisk design vessel currently under construction at Dakota Creek Industries (Hull #63) in Anacortes, WA

Fishermen's Finest ~ a team of excellence ~ our name says it all. 

Bering Sea Birthday National Fisherman Magazine / North Pacific Focus Summer 2015
by Konrad Uri

As I look back upon my fishing career, many fond memories come to mind (especially as I get older and sentimental).  They might not have always been easy times fishing in the Bering Sea in the days before internet and satellite phones, let alone GPS, but the one thing the isolation of fishing in such remote locations brought to us was a team spirit to work together and get things done.  We had a loran, radar, vhf, and a single sideband radio. 

The vessel was our family vessel, F/V Rainier (110’ Martinolich Crabber) and I had my wife and two kids along as well as my nephew; the crew was completed by Arnt Jorgensen, Harold Mathisen, & Erling Skaar.